Wednesday, 1 June 2016

Rainbow Rose QAL Week 1: Fabric Selection

Happy National Quilting week and Welcome to our Rainbow Rose QAL! 

For our schedule see the Quilt-A-Long tab at the top of this page.  Over the next 6 weeks we are going to be exploring the colour wheel and making this block, the Rainbow Rose, in your choice of 2 sizes to make either a 40” x 40” baby quilt or a larger lap or bed quilt 80” x 80”.

Prizes!
Joining us on our QAL journey are our very generous sponsors (see below).   We are kicking off the QAL with a fat quarter bundle to the value of €20 from LoveFabric.ie.

To win a bundle of fabrics from the Cotton Candy range by Dashwood Studios, link up a photo, instagram or flickr image, or a blog post of your fabric pull for the Rainbow Rose block by clicking the blue linky button at the end of this post.

Random number generator will choose a winner to be announced next week!  The linky will be open until midnight next Tuesday and the winner announced next Wednesday when we move onto cutting and piecing some of our block!

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The Rainbow Rose Quilt Block

The Rainbow Rose quilt block is based on the colour wheel rather than the rainbow itself. A traditional rainbow has 7 colours, though in reality your eye can see way more colours than that. You don't always see all of the rainbow spectrum in real life, depending on your position to the sun, but when you get a good rainbow view, it's pretty spectacular isn't it!

In school we learned that the rainbow is made up of Red, Orange, Yellow , Green, Blue, Indigo and Violet, by remembering :

Richard Of York Gave Battle In Vain under a rainbow sky.

There are other mnemonics to remember the rainbow colours and I'll leave you to look them up. I have no idea who poor Richard was but his defeat is certainly famous and has been stuck in my head since 5th year Physics!

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The colour wheel usually contains 12 colours and many books have been written on colour theory especially for quilters! Not to go into too much detail but to give an overview, the colour wheel is typically made up of:

3 primary colours which are used to make up all other colours.

3 secondary colours - Mixing 2 primary colours gives you the secondary colours

6 Tertiary colours - mixing secondary +primary colours

Light is different from paints and pigments in that the primary colours of light are Red, Green and Blue or RGB. You will often see an RGB value in photo editing software. Red Green & Blue combined make white and the absence of Red, Green and Blue gives you black. Varying the values of each can give you many colours which can be displayed on your monitor or TV. All the various colours that can be displayed may not necessarily be able to be printed. Paints and Pigments are a little different!

imageFor paints and pigments, the primary colours of the traditional colour wheel, are taken as Red, Yellow & Blue. (Versions of these colours commonly used are Magenta, Yellow and Cyan! This is what you will find in your printer with the addition of black - CMYK.)


Mixing 2 primary colours gives you the secondary colours:

Red + Yellow = Orange

Yellow + Blue = Green

Red + Blue = Purple

Mixing secondary colours gives you tertiary colours which are very descriptive e.g.

green-yellow, yellow–orange, orange-red, red–purple, purple-blue and blue–green


Putting all of these into the colour wheel gives you:

Red
Red-Orange (Coral)
Orange
Orange-Yellow (Amber)
Yellow
Yellow-Green (Lime or Chartreuse)
Green
Green-Blue (Cyan or Turquoise)
Blue
Blue- Purple (Violet)
Purple
Purple-Red (Red berry colours or Cerise)

Quilts can still read as a rainbow palette even when one colour is missing. Instead of purple I included greys in my triangle quilt and started with green at the centre instead of red!   
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For the purpose of our Rainbow Rose try and find various prints from 12 to 16 colours to get you all the way around the colour wheel. I included pink, turquoise and sky blue as extra steps to make the transitions blend. While technically lighter versions of red, blue- green and blue it can make the colour changes in the wheel look more smooth and I think more pleasing in the quilt block.

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I broke open charm packs and layer cakes as well as pulling fat quarters to make it all the way around the wheel! It helped a lot to say the colour names in my head like orange-red to pick a blender, telling myself coral or amber, I found I was restricting myself somewhat! Trust your instincts. Everyone sees colour differently. I see blue-greens more as green than blue so go with your gut and what feels right for you!


In the end I went with a scrappy look and tried to find 4 different prints for each of the corners, Orange, Pink, Blue & Green and at least 2 different prints for the middles which for me were Purple, Red, Yellow and Turquoise. Avoid prints that have too much white in them, a little is ok, as long as the overall colour reads as the dominant colour you want, it will work!

What you will need!

For the baby quilt we will be using 5" colour squares + background fabric.

For the bed quilt we will be using 10" colour squares + background fabric. This could be a good opportunity to use some large print fabric you may have in your stash.

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Colour is relative and can be perceived differently by the brain when placed next to another colour. As there are so many colours in the wheel itself I would suggest keeping the background fabric to a neutral colour such as white,black, grey or beige. I choose Kona Snow as my background colour - it's one of my favourite off white fabrics to use. You could play with high value/low volume fabrics too for less contrast in your quilt  or a light tone on tone fabric would work beautifully too!


You will need a yard of background fabric for the baby quilt (40" x 40") approx.
 
The lap/bed quilt block finishes at 72" x 72" and using a background colour border it will finish at 80" x 80" and require 3 1/4 yards of background fabric. If you want to make just the block on its own you will need 2 yards of background fabric.

So get gathering and next week we'll start cutting up all that lovely fabric!

Remember to link up to win this brilliant prize from LoveFabric.ie.

Thank you to all our very generous sponsors.  Please share the love and visit our sponsors by clicking on each of the photos below! 

Click on images below to visit our sponsors shops:
giddy  Just sew nowlovefabric.ie  QSTsew crafty  slaney  Fluffy

Spread the word - the more the merrier!

25 comments:

  1. How many 5" or 10" squares will we need?

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    1. Hi Yvonne, it's hard to say exactly how many squares of each colour you will need as it will depend on your colour choices and mix of colours in your stash to make a blended rainbow but in total we will need 38 coloured squares!

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  2. Lovely to read through all this with breakfast this morning. Looking forward to going through my fabric!

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  3. Ruth, am I right to understand that in many cases we'll be working not with the squares, but with half-square triangles, and there is no mass-production of HSTs involved? I am thinking of using some of the scraps that are big enough for the triangles but not the squares and also of using as many color shades as possible - each triangle a different fabric (or as many as I can find).

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    1. Hi Lena, yes you are right. The corners have 7 coloured triangles and 1 square for each corner, 2 triangles and 2 corners for the middle sections of the outer ring and the centre star is all triangles! Your approach will work perfectly! It will be fun to see this with all different fabrics!

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  4. Is this a free quilt along? Just want to make sure I don't need to order a pattern.

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    1. Hi Kathy yes it's free! Next week I'll give cutting instructions and the three weeks after that we'll be making different sections of the block - the middle of the outer ring, corners, centre star and finally assembly & borders. All instuctions will be given during the quilt a long to make the block in 2 sizes so you can make a baby or a bed quilt!

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  5. Great. I just may decide to do it.

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  6. THANKS to You+all the above Sponsors!
    msstitcher1214@gmail.com

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  7. This looks great fun , the different colourways give such interest

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  8. Just reading a book about Richard of York . He was brother of King Edward if England (York family) . And when Edward died the hunchback Richard imorisoned the two princes in the tower and allegedly killed them. It wa all in vain as he never became King himself . Was found in a carpark in Leicester a coupledom years agi buried deep . After the battle of bosworth. Couldn't resist showing off here !!

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    1. I never connected the two! I remember them finding him buried under a car park!

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  9. Wonderful color wheel discussion. We were taught 'Roy G Biv' for color wheels in US (and I've remembered it ever since). If you added a we bit of color theory (for quilts, e.g. Complimentary, Split Complimentary, Analogous, Achromatic and, of course, monochromatic)) it would be best color wheel discussion for new quilters I've seen!

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    1. Thanks Sally yes we'll be covering some of the colour wheel colour schemes as we go along!

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  10. Richard of York was the last of the York Kings - he is the king supposed to have murdered his nephews (the princes in the tower) to take his brother's throne. He lost the throne to Henry Tudor (Henry VII, father of Henry VIII, he of the eight wives) at the Battle of Bosworth, Shakespeare gives him the line "a horse a horse, my kingdom for a horse" but he looses both horse and kingdom and life. His body was found under a council car park in Leicester a few years ago!
    Potted English history aside, this is a gorgeous pattern; I'm going to have to go stash diving!!

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    1. Thanks Carie! Makes the rhyme more interesting!

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  11. Oh man, I'm too late to link up! But I'll still quilt=a-long with you guys! Got my fabrics.

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    1. You can link up to this week if you like. Any progress counts to be in with a chance to win the FQ bundle!

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  12. Ruth, I'll be a little behind but am definitely joining in! Your lessons on color intrigued me so much that I decided to go with the rainbow. It will be an adventure and a fun way to learn.

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    1. Brilliant! You can link up any progress at any stage and the final post for show and tell showing finished quilts and quilt tops is July 20 so lots of time to play along!

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  13. I'm so confused with how many colours we need!���� (reading middle of the night) �� Do you have directions /a list on how many squares of each colour we need? I'd love to quilt a long

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    1. This weeks challenge is to look at your stash and try and build a colour wheel from your fabric that blends all the way around. As your stash is different from mine you may have more reds and I might have more blues so our colour wheels would look a little bit different. If you like, you can wait and have a look at week 2 where the number of squares and colours I used are laid out (2 prints each of 4 colours: red, yellow, turquoise and purple) and week 3 the corners which can be made from all different fabrics or the colours I used (4 prints of pink, orange, green & blue!)

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